About This Blog

SQL Server internals information including my content from SQLBlog.com and SQLPerformance.com.
Showing posts with label Bugs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bugs. Show all posts

Sunday, 26 July 2020

A bug with Halloween Protection and the OUTPUT Clause

A bug with Halloween Protection and the OUTPUT Clause

Background

The OUTPUT clause can be used to return results from an INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, or MERGE statement. The data can be returned to the client, inserted to a table, or both.

There are two ways to add OUTPUT data to a table:

  1. Using OUTPUT INTO
  2. With an outer INSERT statement.

For example:

-- Test table
DECLARE @Target table
(
    id integer IDENTITY (1, 1) NOT NULL, 
    c1 integer NULL
);

-- Holds rows from the OUTPUT clause
DECLARE @Output table 
(
    id integer NOT NULL, 
    c1 integer NULL
);

Wednesday, 21 August 2013

Incorrect Results Caused By Adding an Index

Incorrect Results Caused By Adding an Index

Say you have the following two tables, one partitioned and one not:

CREATE PARTITION FUNCTION PF (integer)
AS RANGE RIGHT
FOR VALUES (1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000);

CREATE PARTITION SCHEME PS
AS PARTITION PF
ALL TO ([PRIMARY]);

-- Partitioned
CREATE TABLE dbo.T1
(
    T1ID    integer NOT NULL,
    SomeID  integer NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK dbo.T1 T1ID]
        PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (T1ID)
        ON PS (T1ID)
);

-- Not partitioned
CREATE TABLE dbo.T2
(
    T2ID    integer IDENTITY (1,1) NOT NULL,
    T1ID    integer NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK dbo.T2 T2ID]
        PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (T2ID)
        ON [PRIMARY]
);

Wednesday, 24 July 2013

Two Partitioning Peculiarities

Two Partitioning Peculiarities

Table partitioning in SQL Server is essentially a way of making multiple physical tables (row sets) look like a single table. This abstraction is performed entirely by the query processor, a design that makes things simpler for users, but which makes complex demands of the query optimizer.

This post looks at two examples which exceed the optimizer’s abilities in SQL Server 2008 onward.

Thursday, 18 July 2013

Aggregates and Partitioning

Aggregates and Partitioning

The changes in the internal representation of partitioned tables between SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2008 resulted in improved query plans and performance in the majority of cases (especially when parallel execution is involved).

Unfortunately, the same changes caused some things that worked well in SQL Server 2005 to suddenly not work so well in SQL Server 2008 and later.

This post looks at a one example where the SQL Server 2005 query optimizer produced a superior execution plan compared with later versions.

Monday, 8 July 2013

Working Around Missed Optimizations

Working Around Missed Optimizations

In my last post, we saw how a query featuring a scalar aggregate could be transformed by the optimizer to a more efficient form. As a reminder, here’s the schema again:

Thursday, 4 April 2013

Optimizer Limitations with Filtered Indexes

Optimizer Limitations with Filtered Indexes

One of the filtered index use cases mentioned in the product documentation concerns a column that contains mostly NULL values. The idea is to create a filtered index that excludes the NULLs, resulting in a smaller nonclustered index that requires less maintenance than the equivalent unfiltered index.

Another popular use of filtered indexes is to filter NULLs from a UNIQUE index, giving the behaviour users of other database engines might expect from a default UNIQUE index or constraint: Uniqueness enforced only for non-NULL values.

Unfortunately, the query optimizer has limitations where filtered indexes are concerned. This post looks at a couple of less well-known examples.

Wednesday, 6 February 2013

Incorrect Results with Indexed Views

Incorrect Results with Indexed Views

If you use MERGE, indexed views and foreign keys, your queries might return incorrect results. Microsoft have released a fix for incorrect results returned when querying an indexed view. The problem applies to:

  • SQL Server 2012
  • SQL Server 2008 R2
  • SQL Server 2008

The Knowledge Base article does not go into detail, or provide a reproduction script, but this blog post does.

Monday, 10 December 2012

MERGE Bug with Filtered Indexes

MERGE Bug with Filtered Indexes

A MERGE statement can fail, and incorrectly report a unique key violation when:

  • The target table uses a unique filtered index; and
  • No key column of the filtered index is updated; and
  • A column from the filtering condition is updated; and
  • Transient key violations are possible

Monday, 15 October 2012

Cardinality Estimation Bug with Lookups

Cardinality Estimation Bug with Lookups

Estimated row counts on Key or RID Lookups where a filtering predicate is applied can be wrong in SSMS execution plans.

This error does not affect the optimizer’s ultimate plan selection, but it does look odd.

There are other cases where estimated row counts are inconsistent (for defensible reasons) but the behaviour shown in this post in certainly a bug.

Tuesday, 6 December 2011

SQL Server Optimizer Bug with JOIN and GROUP BY

SQL Server Optimizer Bug with JOIN and GROUP BY

I came across a SQL Server optimizer bug recently that made me wonder how on earth I never noticed it before.

As the title of this post suggests, the bug occurs in common JOIN and GROUP BY queries. While it does not cause incorrect results to be returned, it will often cause a poor query plan to be selected by the optimizer.

If you are just interested in the bug itself, you will find a description in the section headed “the bug revealed”. It relates to cardinality estimation for serial partial aggregates.

As the regular reader will be expecting though, I am going to work up to it with a bit of background. The lasting value of this post (once the bug is fixed) is in the background details anyway.

Sunday, 27 February 2011

SQL Server Bug: Slow T-SQL Sums and Averages

SQL Server Bug: Slow T-SQL Sums and Averages

It’s a curious thing about SQL that the SUM or AVG of no items (an empty set) is not zero, it’s NULL.

In this post, you’ll see how this means your SUM and AVG calculations might run at half speed, or worse. As usual though, this entry is not so much about the result, but the journey we take to get there.

Wednesday, 4 August 2010

An Interesting MERGE Bug

An Interesting MERGE Bug

Investigating an optimizer transformation that exposes a bug in SQL Server’s MERGE implementation.