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SQL Server internals information including my content from SQLBlog.com and SQLPerformance.com.
Showing posts with label Parallelism. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Parallelism. Show all posts

Saturday, 5 June 2021

Empty Parallel Zones

Empty Parallel Zones

An empty parallel zone is an area of the plan bounded by exchanges (or the leaf level) containing no operators.

How and why does SQL Server sometimes generate a parallel plan with an empty parallel zone?

Wednesday, 24 March 2021

Incorrect Results with Parallel Eager Spools and Batch Mode

Incorrect Results with Parallel Eager Spools and Batch Mode

You might have noticed a warning at the top of the release notes for SQL Server 2016 SP2 CU 16:

Note: After you apply CU 16 for SQL Server 2016 SP2, you might encounter an issue in which DML (insert/update/delete) queries that use parallel plans cannot complete any execution and encounter HP_SPOOL_BARRIER waits. You can use the trace flag 13116 or MAXDOP=1 hint to work around this issue. This issue is related to the introduction of fix for 13685819 and it will be fixed in the next Cumulative Update.

That warning links to bug reference 13685819 on the same page. There isn’t a separate KB article, only the description:

Fixes an issue with insert query in SQL Server 2016 that reads the data from the same table and uses a parallel execution plan may produce duplicate rows

Sunday, 5 July 2020

How MAXDOP Really Works

How MAXDOP Really Works

A few days ago I ran a Twitter poll:

Twitter poll

The most popular answer gets highlighted by Twitter at the end of the poll, but as with many things on social media, that doesn’t mean it is correct:

Thursday, 3 May 2012

Parallel Execution Plans Suck

Parallel Execution Plans Suck

Summary: A deep dive into SQL Server parallelism, and a potential performance problem with parallel plans that use TOP.

Friday, 23 December 2011

Forcing a Parallel Query Execution Plan

Forcing a Parallel Query Execution Plan

This article is for SQL Server developers who have experienced the special kind of frustration that only comes from spending hours trying to convince the query optimizer to generate a parallel execution plan.

This situation often occurs when making an apparently innocuous change to the text of a moderately complex query — a change which somehow manages to turn a parallel plan that executes in ten seconds, into a five-minute serially-executing monster.

Thursday, 7 July 2011

Bitmap Magic (or… how SQL Server uses bitmap filters)

Bitmap Magic (or… how SQL Server uses bitmap filters)

Question

Can a parallel query use less CPU than the same serial query, while executing faster?

The answer is yes! To demonstrate, I’ll use the following two (heap) tables, each containing a single column typed as integer:

Tables #BuiltInt and #Probe

Saturday, 5 March 2011

How Parallelism Works in SQL Server

How Parallelism Works in SQL Server

You might have noticed that January was a quiet blogging month for me.

Part of the reason was that I was working on an article for Simple Talk, looking at how parallel query execution really works. The first part is published today at:

Understanding and Using Parallelism in SQL Server.

This introductory piece is not quite as technical as normal, but I hope there be enough interesting material there to make it worth a read.

© Paul White
email: SQLkiwi@gmail.com
twitter: @SQL_Kiwi

Thursday, 4 November 2010

Myth: SQL Server Caches a Serial Plan with every Parallel Plan

Myth: SQL Server Caches a Serial Plan with every Parallel Plan

Many people believe that whenever SQL Server creates an execution plan that uses parallelism, an alternative serial plan is also cached.

The idea seems to be that the execution engine then decides between the parallel and serial alternatives at runtime. I’ve seen this on forums, in blogs, and even in books.

In fairness, a lot of the official documentation is not as clear as it might be on the subject. In this post I will show that only a single (parallel) plan is cached. I will also show that SQL Server can execute a parallel plan on a single thread.