About This Blog

A copy of my content from SQLBlog.com plus occasional new content.
Showing posts with label TSQL. Show all posts
Showing posts with label TSQL. Show all posts

Monday, 12 March 2012

Fun with Scalar and Vector Aggregates

Fun with Scalar and Vector Aggregates

There are interesting things to be learned from even the simplest queries.

For example, imagine you are asked to write a query that lists AdventureWorks product names, where the product has at least one entry in the transaction history table, but fewer than ten.

Sunday, 4 December 2011

Is Distinct Aggregation Still Considered Harmful?

Is Distinct Aggregation Still Considered Harmful?

Back in 2008, Marc Friedman of the SQL Server Query Processor Team wrote a blog entry entitled “Distinct Aggregation Considered Harmful”.

Marc shows a way to work around the poor performance that often results simply from adding the keyword DISTINCT to an otherwise perfectly reasonable aggregate function in a query.

This post is an update to that work, presenting a query optimizer enhancement in SQL Server 2012 that reduces the need to perform the suggested rewrite manually.

Saturday, 5 March 2011

How Parallelism Works in SQL Server

How Parallelism Works in SQL Server

You might have noticed that January was a quiet blogging month for me.

Part of the reason was that I was working on an article for Simple Talk, looking at how parallel query execution really works. The first part is published today at:

http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/learn-sql-server/understanding-and-using-parallelism-in-sql-server/.

This introductory piece is not quite as technical as normal, but I hope there be enough interesting material there to make it worth a read.

© Paul White
email: SQLkiwi@gmail.com
twitter: @SQL_Kiwi

Friday, 27 August 2010

Sorting, Row Goals, and the TOP 100 Problem

Sorting, Row Goals, and the TOP 100 Problem

When you write a query to return the first few rows from a potential result set, you’ll often use the TOP clause.

To give a precise meaning to the TOP operation, it will normally be accompanied by an ORDER BY clause. Together, the TOP…ORDER BY construction can be used to precisely identify which top ‘n’ rows should be returned.