About This Blog

A copy of my content from SQLBlog.com and SQLPerformance.com, plus occasional new content.

Saturday, 31 August 2013

Nested Loops Prefetching

Nested Loops Prefetching

Nested loops join query plans can be a lot more interesting (and complicated) than is commonly realized.

One query plan area I get asked about a lot is prefetching. It is not documented in full detail anywhere, so this seems like a good topic to address in a blog post.

The examples used in this article are based on questions asked by Adam Machanic.

Wednesday, 28 August 2013

Parameter Sniffing, Embedding, and the RECOMPILE Options

Parameter Sniffing, Embedding, and the RECOMPILE Options

Parameter Sniffing

Query parameterization promotes the reuse of cached execution plans, thereby avoiding unnecessary compilations, and reducing the number of ad-hoc queries in the plan cache.

These are all good things, provided the query being parameterized really ought to use the same cached execution plan for different parameter values. An execution plan that is efficient for one parameter value may not be a good choice for other possible parameter values.

When parameter sniffing is enabled (the default), SQL Server chooses an execution plan based on the particular parameter values that exist at compilation time. The implicit assumption is that parameterized statements are most commonly executed with the most common parameter values. This sounds reasonable enough (even obvious) and indeed it often works well.

A problem can occur when an automatic recompilation of the cached plan occurs. A recompilation may be triggered for all sorts of reasons, for example because an index used by the cached plan has been dropped (a correctness recompilation) or because statistical information has changed (an optimality recompile).

Whatever the exact cause of the plan recompilation, there is a chance that an atypical value is being passed as a parameter at the time the new plan is generated. This can result in a new cached plan (based on the sniffed atypical parameter value) that is not good for the majority of executions for which it will be reused.

It is not easy to predict when a particular execution plan will be recompiled (for example, because statistics have changed sufficiently) resulting in a situation where a good-quality reusable plan can be suddenly replaced by a quite different plan optimized for atypical parameter values.

One such scenario occurs when the atypical value is highly selective, resulting in a plan optimized for a small number of rows. Such plans will often use single-threaded execution, nested loops joins, and lookups. Serious performance issues can arise when this plan is reused for different parameter values that generate a much larger number of rows.

Wednesday, 21 August 2013

Incorrect Results Caused By Adding an Index

Incorrect Results Caused By Adding an Index

Say you have the following two tables, one partitioned and one not:

CREATE PARTITION FUNCTION PF (integer)
AS RANGE RIGHT
FOR VALUES (1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000);

CREATE PARTITION SCHEME PS
AS PARTITION PF
ALL TO ([PRIMARY]);

-- Partitioned
CREATE TABLE dbo.T1
(
    T1ID    integer NOT NULL,
    SomeID  integer NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK dbo.T1 T1ID]
        PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (T1ID)
        ON PS (T1ID)
);

-- Not partitioned
CREATE TABLE dbo.T2
(
    T2ID    integer IDENTITY (1,1) NOT NULL,
    T1ID    integer NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK dbo.T2 T2ID]
        PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (T2ID)
        ON [PRIMARY]
);