About This Blog

Including my content from SQLBlog.com and some from SQLPerformance.com

Thursday, 17 February 2011

Seeking Without Indexes

Seeking Without Indexes

A seek can contain one or more seek predicates, each of which can either identify (at most) one row in a unique index (a singleton lookup) or a range of values (a range scan).

When looking at an execution plan, we often need to look at the details of the seek operator in the Properties window to see how many operations it is performing, and what type of operation each one is.

As seen in the first post of this mini-series, When is a Seek not a Seek? the number of hidden seeking operations can have an appreciable impact on performance.

So…is it a Seek or a Scan?

So…is it a Seek or a Scan?

You might be most familiar with the terms ‘Seek’ and ‘Scan’ from the graphical plans produced by SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS). You might look to the SSMS tool-tip descriptions to explain the differences between them:

Scan and Seek tooltips

Both mention scans and ranges (nothing about seeks) and the Index Seek description maybe implies that it will not scan the index entirely (which isn’t necessarily true). Not massively helpful.

Wednesday, 16 February 2011

When is a Seek not a Seek?

When is a Seek not a Seek?

The following script creates a single-column clustered table containing the integers from 1 to 1,000 inclusive.

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#Test', N'U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    DROP TABLE #Test
END;
GO
CREATE TABLE #Test
(
    id integer PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
);
INSERT #Test
    (id)
SELECT
    V.number
FROM master.dbo.spt_values AS V
WHERE
    V.[type] = N'P'
    AND V.number BETWEEN 1 AND 1000;

Let’s say we are given the following task:

Find the rows with values from 100 to 170, excluding any values that divide exactly by 10.

Tuesday, 14 December 2010

Beware Sneaky Reads with Unique Indexes

Beware Sneaky Reads with Unique Indexes

I saw a question asked recently on the #sqlhelp hash tag:

Might SQL Server retrieve (out-of-row) LOB data from a table, even if the column isn’t referenced in the query?

Leaving aside trivial cases like selecting a computed column that does reference the LOB data, one might be tempted to say that no, SQL Server does not read data you haven’t asked for.

In general, that is correct; however, there are cases where SQL Server might sneakily read a LOB column.

Friday, 10 December 2010

Heaps of Trouble?

Heaps of Trouble?

Brad Schulz recently wrote about optimizing a query run against tables with no indexes at all. The problem was, predictably, that performance was not very good. The catch was that we are not allowed to create any indexes (or even new statistics) as part of our optimization efforts.

In this post, I’m going to look at the problem from a different angle, and present an alternative solution to the one Brad found.

Thursday, 4 November 2010

Myth: SQL Server Caches a Serial Plan with every Parallel Plan

Myth: SQL Server Caches a Serial Plan with every Parallel Plan

Many people believe that whenever SQL Server creates an execution plan that uses parallelism, an alternative serial plan is also cached.

The idea seems to be that the execution engine then decides between the parallel and serial alternatives at runtime. I’ve seen this on forums, in blogs, and even in books.

In fairness, a lot of the official documentation is not as clear as it might be on the subject. In this post I will show that only a single (parallel) plan is cached. I will also show that SQL Server can execute a parallel plan on a single thread.

Monday, 1 November 2010

The Case of the Missing Shared Locks

The Case of the Missing Shared Locks

This post covers a little-known locking optimization that provides a surprising answer to the question:

If I hold an exclusive lock on a row, can another transaction running at the default read committed isolation level read it?

Most people would answer ‘no’, on the basis that the read would block when it tried to acquire a shared lock. Others might respond that it depends on whether the READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT database option was in effect, but let’s assume that is not the case, and we are dealing simply with the default (locking) read committed isolation level.

Tuesday, 19 October 2010

Sequence Tables

Sequence Tables

It is frequently useful to generate sequences of values within SQL Server, perhaps for use as surrogate keys. Using the IDENTITY property on a column is the easiest way to automatically generate such sequences:

CREATE TABLE dbo.SomeTable
(
    row_id integer IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    [data] sql_variant NOT NULL,
);

Sometimes though, the database designer needs a more flexible scheme than is provided by the IDENTITY property. One alternative is to use a Sequence Table.

Thursday, 23 September 2010

A Tale of Two Index Hints

A Tale of Two Index Hints

If you look up Table Hints in the official documentation, you’ll find the following statements:

If a clustered index exists, INDEX(0) forces a clustered index scan and INDEX(1) forces a clustered index scan or seek.

If no clustered index exists, INDEX(0) forces a table scan and INDEX(1) is interpreted as an error.

The interesting thing there is that both hints can result in a scan. If that is the case, you might wonder if there is any effective difference between the two.

This blog entry explores that question, and highlights an optimizer quirk that can result in a much less efficient query plan when using INDEX(0). I’ll also cover some stuff about ordering guarantees.

Wednesday, 1 September 2010

Inside the Optimizer: Plan Costing

Inside the Optimizer: Plan Costing

A detailed look at costing, and more undocumented optimizer fun.

The SQL Server query optimizer generates a number of physical plan alternatives from a logical requirement expressed in T-SQL. If full cost-based optimization is required, a cost is assigned to each iterator in each alternative plan, and the plan with the lowest overall cost is ultimately selected for execution.